The Harvard Anechoic Chamber was a perfectly soundproof room where Harvard physicists and engineers studied acoustics for more than 20 years following World War II. When it was demolished in 1971, the Harvard Crimson wrote, “The only place at Harvard where you could hear yourself think has been destroyed.”

The Harvard Anechoic Chamber was a perfectly soundproof room where Harvard physicists and engineers studied acoustics for more than 20 years following World War II. When it was demolished in 1971, the Harvard Crimson wrote, “The only place at Harvard where you could hear yourself think has been destroyed.”

For his senior thesis, Alec DeLaney ‘14 designed an ultraviolet (UV) water purification system, combining his interest in environmental technology with a love of the outdoors, especially wilderness backpacking.
The Society of American Military Engineers has awarded him the 2014 Colonel and Mrs. S. S. Dennis, III Scholarship in recognition of his hard work and dedication to research.

For his senior thesis, Alec DeLaney ‘14 designed an ultraviolet (UV) water purification system, combining his interest in environmental technology with a love of the outdoors, especially wilderness backpacking.

The Society of American Military Engineers has awarded him the 2014 Colonel and Mrs. S. S. Dennis, III Scholarship in recognition of his hard work and dedication to research.

Last week we launched a new exhibit of the Harvard Mark I, the first programmable computer in the United States, which was built in 1944 and helped launch the computing revolution.

The Mark I was of “light weight, trim appearance,” according to a brochure published a year later, in 1945. It was 51 feet long, 8 feet high, and weighed 10,000 pounds. The machine contained thousands of gears, switches, and control circuits, and was driven by an electric motor that turned a 50-foot shaft.

At a ceremony in the Science Center, amid cheers and applause, we turned it back on.

(Photos by Eliza Grinnell, SEAS Communications.)

Successful coding has many levels to it. If the code works, that’s a big milestone to many students. But it can also get very poetic with as few lines, characters and symbols as possible. I also want to push back against the idea that there is one type of person or one set of interests that benefit from coding. Think about lawyers, who need to make rock solid legal contracts. Contracts, without loopholes, or without bugs if you will. People who want to be more methodical and better organize information can learn these skills through computer science.
David Malan, senior lecturer on computer science at Harvard SEAS
It is telling that lab alumni often maintain connections with the lab and view other ‘Mooniacs’ … as a sort of extended family, even if their time in the lab never overlapped.
A former student describes Prof. David J. Mooney, who has just received the Capers and Marion McDonald Award for Excellence in Mentoring and Advising

Many creatures—like this beautiful spangled cotinga—use structural color rather than pigments to produce vibrant hues. That’s rare in artificial materials, but Harvard engineers have invented a way to reproduce it. These new microcapsules could offer a non-toxic and long-lasting source of color for paints and electronic displays. Read how we’re developing brighter inks, without pigment.

Image credits: Top left, courtesy of Curious Expeditions/Flickr under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 2.0. Top right & bottom: courtesy of Jin-Gyu Park, Harvard SEAS.

houghtonlib:

"For the sake of brevity we will write this number as π; thus π is equal to half the circumference of a circle of radius 1.”

Euler, Leonhard, 1707-1783. Introductio in analysin infinitorum, 1748.

*GC7 Eu536 748i

Houghton Library, Harvard University

The Harvard Computation Laboratory at night (ca. 1947)
It was around this time that the lab’s director, Howard Aiken, reputedly predicted that “only six electronic digital computers would be required to satisfy the computing needs of the entire United States.”
Yet Aiken and his graduate students were pioneers in the early days of computing machine design and theory.
"Within a few years, courses of instruction were offered at Harvard in a variety of topics including numerical analysis, switching theory, computer hardware, and automatic data processing," wrote Gerard Salton, a former student. "In the areas of computer use and instruction, Harvard seemed to be ahead of anyone else by some ten years."

The Harvard Computation Laboratory at night (ca. 1947)

It was around this time that the lab’s director, Howard Aiken, reputedly predicted that “only six electronic digital computers would be required to satisfy the computing needs of the entire United States.”

Yet Aiken and his graduate students were pioneers in the early days of computing machine design and theory.

"Within a few years, courses of instruction were offered at Harvard in a variety of topics including numerical analysis, switching theory, computer hardware, and automatic data processing," wrote Gerard Salton, a former student. "In the areas of computer use and instruction, Harvard seemed to be ahead of anyone else by some ten years."

They were in full-throttle tooth-development mode.
Basma Hashmi, a Ph.D. student at Harvard SEAS. She is the lead author of a new paper on engineering artificial teeth.
Jelani Nelson, Assistant Professor of Computer Science and an expert in algorithms for big data analysis, has been selected to receive the prestigious NSF CAREER Award!

Jelani Nelson, Assistant Professor of Computer Science and an expert in algorithms for big data analysis, has been selected to receive the prestigious NSF CAREER Award!