No matter where you’re coming from, if you want to understand technology, if you want to make a positive impact in a technology-driven world, you belong in a SEAS classroom. This is ‘engineering for everyone.’
Cherry A. Murray, dean of Harvard SEAS
Science & Cooking public lecture series

Harvard’s popular Science & Cooking lecture series will return on September 8, bringing world-class chefs and eminent food experts to campus for weekly talks and demonstrations that are open to the public.

Most of the guests and topics this year will be entirely new, as the series welcomes for the first time the internationally renowned chefs Dominique Crenn and Daniel Humm, among many others.

Hosted by the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the public lecture series runs through the end of the fall semester. A full schedule, including the lecture topics, is available online: Science & Cooking lecture series returns to Harvard on September 8

Just as trillions of individual cells can assemble into an intelligent organism, or a thousand starlings can form a great flowing murmuration across the sky, these Kilobots demonstrate how complexity can arise from very simple behaviors performed en masse (see video). To computer scientists, they also represent a significant milestone in the development of collective artificial intelligence. Read about the first self-organizing thousand-robot swarm.

Just as trillions of individual cells can assemble into an intelligent organism, or a thousand starlings can form a great flowing murmuration across the sky, these Kilobots demonstrate how complexity can arise from very simple behaviors performed en masse (see video). To computer scientists, they also represent a significant milestone in the development of collective artificial intelligence. Read about the first self-organizing thousand-robot swarm.

The beauty of biological systems is that they are elegantly simple—and yet, in large numbers, accomplish the seemingly impossible.
Radhika Nagpal, the Fred Kavli Professor of Computer Science at Harvard SEAS. Her research group just unveiled the first self-organizing thousand-robot swarm.

The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University.

We call them the Kilobots.

“Our research provides the first real physical understanding of the cytoplasm in mammalian cells,” says Ming Guo, Ph.D. ’14.

Read "Inside the cell, an ocean of buffeting waves.”

Math is really useful in cooking. It was neat to see how fractions worked, like how you can change how many portions you want to make, or how some ingredients changes things. It’s so cool.
Zoe Padilla, age 12. She participated in our free Science & Cooking for Kids program this summer.

This robot, developed in Prof. Rob Wood’s lab, folds itself up and walks away.

TBT: Founding of the Lawrence Scientific School at Harvard, 1847
"If his generosity fail not of its object, i.e. if the persons selected to carry out his views for the scientific education of the rising generation are qualified for their trust, his magnificent foundation will be of the greatest service to the interests of the Republic, Science and Humanity. For himself he has erected a monument more durable than brass or marble."
(Harvard University Archives)

TBT: Founding of the Lawrence Scientific School at Harvard, 1847

"If his generosity fail not of its object, i.e. if the persons selected to carry out his views for the scientific education of the rising generation are qualified for their trust, his magnificent foundation will be of the greatest service to the interests of the Republic, Science and Humanity. For himself he has erected a monument more durable than brass or marble."

(Harvard University Archives)

Prof. Jim Rice, an expert on earthquakes, glaciers, landslides, and other aspects of geophysics, will be honored for his “fundamental contributions to mechanics and its engineering applications.” He has been selected to receive the Theodore von Karman Medal of the American Society of Civil Engineers.