Muxi Li, SM ‘14, is receiving the Master of Science in computational science & engineering.
At a career fair back in October, she said: “I think my skills are very desirable. My concern is whether I can survive the interviews!”
She has landed a position as a data scientist at Nokia/Microsoft.
Read more profiles of the Class of 2014 here

Muxi Li, SM ‘14, is receiving the Master of Science in computational science & engineering.

At a career fair back in October, she said: “I think my skills are very desirable. My concern is whether I can survive the interviews!”

She has landed a position as a data scientist at Nokia/Microsoft.

Read more profiles of the Class of 2014 here

Jody Schechter, SM ‘14, is in our first class of master’s candidates in computational science & engineering. For one of her projects this year, she used simulated annealing to optimize taxi cab routes! Following graduation, she will take a position as a data scientist for Booz Allen Hamilton, a management and technology consulting firm.
Read more profiles of the Class of 2014 here

Jody Schechter, SM ‘14, is in our first class of master’s candidates in computational science & engineering. For one of her projects this year, she used simulated annealing to optimize taxi cab routes! Following graduation, she will take a position as a data scientist for Booz Allen Hamilton, a management and technology consulting firm.

Read more profiles of the Class of 2014 here

Conor Myhrvold, SM ‘14, is heading out to continue his science writing career, at Uber. While studying computational science & engineering at Harvard SEAS, he wrote about what ants can teach us about emergency exits, a subject he modeled in CS 205.

Read more profiles of the Class of 2014 here

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Charles Hornbaker, SM ‘14, has served six years as a US Marine Corps intelligence officer and two years working as an intelligence analyst for Defense Department contractors. He is one of the very first students at Harvard SEAS to earn the new Master of Science in Computational Science & Engineering. Next year, he plans to attend Harvard Business School.

Read more profiles of the Class of 2014 here

Now accepting applications! And we’re hosting an info session on Nov. 8.

Sadasivan Shankar, Program Leader for Materials Design at Intel Corp., has been appointed a Distinguished Scientist in Residence at Harvard SEAS. He will teach a graduate-level fall course, Computational Design of Materials. Full announcement here.

Sadasivan Shankar, Program Leader for Materials Design at Intel Corp., has been appointed a Distinguished Scientist in Residence at Harvard SEAS. He will teach a graduate-level fall course, Computational Design of Materials. Full announcement here.

My class has maybe 40, 50 concentrators, but then there’s roughly 200 students who aren’t CS concentrators taking the class,” Morrisett said. “The reality is that for almost any field that you’re in now…you’re going to use computation.
Greg Morrisett, Allen B. Cutting Professor of Computer Science, quoted in a Harvard Crimson article on the tremendous growth in undergraduate enrollment at SEAS
Postdoctoral researcher Lirong Xia at Harvard uses computational science and insights from election theory to improve ranking systems and preference aggregation across the Web. 
»Read more about "Counting votes"

Postdoctoral researcher Lirong Xia at Harvard uses computational science and insights from election theory to improve ranking systems and preference aggregation across the Web.

»Read more about "Counting votes"

One-year master’s ideal for students who wish to apply computation to academic and industry challenges

Cambridge, Mass. – June 1, 2012 – A new master’s degree program in Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) will be launched at Harvard during the coming academic year, with the aim of training new leaders for a future where large-scale computation and advanced mathematical modeling will propel discovery and innovation in fields from psychology to photonics.

The program, developed at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), will begin accepting applications this fall, for enrollment in September 2013.

Emphasizing the application of fundamental knowledge across the frontiers of natural and social sciences, humanities, and engineering, the one-year Master of Science (S.M.) program will provide rigorous training in the mathematical and computing foundations of CSE. Students will apply computation to chosen domains in independent research projects and elective courses. Beginning in 2014 SEAS will also offer a two-year Master of Engineering (M.E.) program, with a second year devoted mainly to research… [more]

Students develop hurricane response plans on Cambridge roads, gaining practical experience in computational science

Imagine a powerful hurricane has wreaked havoc on the city of Cambridge, Mass. Thousands of residents are injured, but debris blocks roads everywhere, preventing medical workers from reaching the victims.

Crews are mobilizing to clear paths between the victims and two medical centers, Mount Auburn Hospital and Harvard University Health Services. Which roads should they open first, in order to quickly reach the largest number of victims? How many of those roads can they actually clear each day with the equipment available?

This was the problem posed to tech-savvy students participating in the IACS Computational Challenge in January. The competition was part of ComputeFest, a 2-week program hosted by the recently created Institute for Applied Computational Science (IACS) within the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

“The amount of debris created by regularly occurring disasters is huge,” said Özlem Ergun, Visiting Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics at SEAS. In her usual post, Ergun is co-director of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics at Georgia Institute of Technology, where she helps emergency management officials plan their response to disasters.

“The first problem,” she said, “is really to figure out in what order to open the streets so that you create connectivity between the population and the critical infrastructure.”

The Cambridge debris data was generated by Georgia Tech graduate students using the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Hazus software, which visually models the human and environmental impacts of earthquakes, hurricanes, and floods.

In the Challenge scenario, 2,478 disaster victims were distributed unevenly across 443 Cambridge locations served by two hospitals (one large, one small), connected by 604 road segments (blocked by varying amounts of debris), and accessed via a fleet of bulldozers that roughly doubled in size over a 9-day cleanup period. A penalty was imposed to simulate the real-life pressure of time—the chance of people losing their lives if help took too long to arrive.

In short, the number of data points and constraints was huge…. [more]