Show us your pearly whites! This engineered “shrinking gel” prompts tooth tissue formation.
(Images courtesy of Basma Hashmi, Harvard SEAS.)

Show us your pearly whites! This engineered “shrinking gel” prompts tooth tissue formation.

(Images courtesy of Basma Hashmi, Harvard SEAS.)

Capasso teaches a genre of science at Harvard University so spectacularly complex that it might as well be magic as far as the lay person is concerned.
Forbes

Harvard physicists have proposed a device to capture energy from Earth’s infrared emissions to outer space—a possible new source of renewable energy. Their analysis of the thermodynamics, practical concerns, and technological requirements will be published this week in PNAS.

“The key is in these beautiful circuit diagrams,” says Prof. Federico Capasso. “We found they had been considered before for another application… and been completely buried in the literature and forgotten. But to try to explain them qualitatively took a lot of effort.”

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(Images courtesy of Eliza Grinnell; Steven J. Byrnes; and Federico Capasso and PNAS.)

When you meet someone who is doing something interesting, ask if they have time to get coffee, and then ask them who else they know who you could get coffee with. You should be drinking a lot of coffee when you’re job searching.
Eleanor Fort, Explore Careers in Energy & Environment panelist, Associate for State and Federal Climate and Energy Policy Program, CERES. Read the full story.  (via ocsharvard)

A sneak peek inside Harvard’s machine shop!  Students learn welding, precision milling, 3D printing and more—all part of a hands-on engineering education. Learn more.

A sneak peak inside Harvard’s machine shop!  Students learn welding, precision milling, 3D printing and more—all part of a hands-on engineering education. Learn more.

If the Oscars were perfectly predictable with math, the suspense would be gone and the ceremony wouldn’t be exciting anymore. But the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is just that – a combination of art and science.

Harvard undergraduate Ben Zauzmer ‘15 (applied math), who correctly predicted 81% of Oscar winners last year using data and mathematics.

With the Academy Awards coming up this weekend, check out the front-runners—according to Ben’s statistical model.

A new DOE project led by researchers at Harvard SEAS and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will study human impacts on tropical rainforest and climate.
Based in Brazil, the field campaign will enable scientists to study the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rainforest atmosphere and land systems, and how these may be perturbed by human influences such as pollution and deforestation. Learn more.

A new DOE project led by researchers at Harvard SEAS and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will study human impacts on tropical rainforest and climate.

Based in Brazil, the field campaign will enable scientists to study the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rainforest atmosphere and land systems, and how these may be perturbed by human influences such as pollution and deforestation. Learn more.

Harvard engineers have created an artificial muscle that recreates the twisting motion of heart muscle.

Prof. Stephen Chong, an expert in information security, has been named a 2014 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow!
The $50,000 award will support his research program, which develops tools and techniques that ensure computer applications handle sensitive information securely. Learn more.

Prof. Stephen Chong, an expert in information security, has been named a 2014 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow!

The $50,000 award will support his research program, which develops tools and techniques that ensure computer applications handle sensitive information securely. Learn more.